There are punk scenes all over the world – vital, colorful, wonderfully abrasive subcultures keeping the flame of independent music burning. But we hope it’s not too controversial to suggest that no punk rock scene is any deeper, any wider, any smarter, or any more passionate than the one that’s flourished in Southern California for the past four decades. Orange County singer and guitarist Greg Antista has long been a part of that scene, first as a listener and supporter, then as a musician, and then as a bandleader in his own right.



Antista played with the late Steve Soto (Agent Orange, The Adolescents) in Joyride, whose 1992 debut set Johnny Bravo remains a watershed in tight and tuneful California punk-pop. He toured Europe and played the Rebellion Festival in the UK with Foxy, another kinetic, exciting punk band. Now, with The Lonely Streets, he’s assembled his own outfit. This new band is a summation of everywhere he’s been and a powerful indication of where he’s going. This May, you’ll be able to hear for yourself with the arrival of The Lonely Streets’ debut album, Shake, Stomp and Stumble. The set was produced by Paul Miner (C.J. Ramone, New Found Glory, Thrice).

All four members of The Lonely Streets make their presences felt in the vibrant clip for “Goodnight Ramona,” the lead single from Shake, Stomp and Stumble — and if you’re a dedicated fan of independent music from Southern California, there’s a good chance you’ll recognize all of them. That’s the marvelously expressive Jessica Kaczmarek of Busstop Hurricanes on lead guitar. Jorge E. Disguster of Mink Daggers hits the skins, and joining him in the Lonely Streets rhythm section is bassist Warren Renfrow of Cadillac Tramps and Manic Hispanic and a former touring member of The Damned and The Adolescents. This is the outfit that jolts Antista’s alternately exuberant, infuriated, and humorous songs into glorious life. They know how to do it;they’ve been at it for decades, and they’re better than ever.

Though it’s brisk and hooky, “Goodnight Ramona” is a song of longing, heartbreak, and miscommunication in a relationship – and the video reflects that subject matter. The Lonely Streets set up the living room of a young couple whose love is genuine but whose ideas about attentiveness are at dangerous variance. Will they put aside their differences and keep dancing, or will circumstances and conflicting goals drive them apart? You’ll just have to watch and see.

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